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Ah, I guess I don't understand how the Torsilastic springs work. I assumed they're a solid torsion bar packed in rubber. How do they slip? Does anyone have a diagram?
Eric767
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2019 10:47 am




Eric,

As I mentioned, someone who knows Eagles needs to look at this one and assess the situation. Yes, it is a torsion bar encased in a rubber compound, and there is an adjustment rod that is turned to bring the bus up to the correct height. If the torsion bar has lost it's tension, in some cases it can be "reindexed" (twisted in its mount and rebolted), and then start the adjustment rod in a new cycle. I have not heard of a torsion bar actually snapping, but since it is old steel under a lot of stress, it might be a possibility. The usual situation is that it loses its ability to resist the load, and even though it has been adjusted, it creeps back down. I have one of my rear torsilastic's failing on my 1984 Model 10. I adjusted it last summer,and now it is back where it was. The Sulastic Company is the only one rebuilding these, just as Mason reported, but the cost of the part and paying someone to do it might double the part cost.

My solution will be to take off a good torsilastic from a donor bus, and install it myself. Those are the two extremes. By the way, you do not need to take the rear axle out to do this, but there will be a lot of work, and the tube is the same for Model 05's and up. If air bags are considered, fabrication of mounting brackets on the frame and on the center of the torsilastic are involved. You mentioned that the current or previous owner had installed some kind of rubber support device to supplement the torsilastic, which sounds strange, maybe it is an airbag system. Detailed pictures would help us sort this out, and if you indicated where the bus was located, perhaps someone nearby from this forum could look at it. Someone might even know this bus personally from working on it, that has happened before. Don't worry about someone trying to snatch up your Eagle prospect, very few people want a car storage setup as a conversion. Most racers use trailers for the cars and equipment. (Of course, if there is just one other person who wants an Eagle with half the length devoted to storing a car, then the bidding race is on). ;)
Walter
Dayton, Ohio
1975 Silvereagle Model 05, 8V71, 4 speed Spicer
1982 Eagle Model 10, 6V92, 5 speed Spicer
1984 Eagle Model 10, 6V92 w/Jacobs, Allison HT740
1994 Eagle Model 15-45, Series 60 w/Jacobs, Allison HT741
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DoubleEagle
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Club Member
 
Posts: 135
Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2018 9:26 pm
Location: Dayton, Ohio




A model 20 with a M11 was probably one of Freedoms Eagles from Indiana when he owned those they were well cared for
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luvrbus
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Posts: 2950
Joined: Mon Oct 13, 2008 12:50 pm




Historically, Cliff (luvrbus) is rarely wrong. Is your bus in Indiana, Eric?
Walter
Dayton, Ohio
1975 Silvereagle Model 05, 8V71, 4 speed Spicer
1982 Eagle Model 10, 6V92, 5 speed Spicer
1984 Eagle Model 10, 6V92 w/Jacobs, Allison HT740
1994 Eagle Model 15-45, Series 60 w/Jacobs, Allison HT741
User avatar
DoubleEagle
Club Member
Club Member
 
Posts: 135
Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2018 9:26 pm
Location: Dayton, Ohio


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